Category Archives: Mobile Society

Enter the Digital Consumer, Driver, Services Buyer

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LinkedIn Pulse The driver consumer holds the keys to $1.5T in future vehicle enabled digital services.

 

Working with a number of our large automotive customers, it becomes clear that what it means to become digital – and to run a digital business – can take on many forms and meanings to different companies based on their organization and their position in the automotive value chain. I have written about the advent of connected platforms, whereby suppliers are moving to land grab specific elements of the ecosystem and lay claim to their use. This includes a number of scenarios about the enhancement and transmission of information from the individual consumer as a driver whether it be to the car, the home, the household appliance and mobile device. McKinsey estimates the market for vehicle enabled digital services to grow to $1.5T by the year 2030.

Understanding how the consumer will function as a services buyer, however, is an entirely different matter whether that individual is a personal vehicle owner, rideshare passenger, renter or simply a passenger in a friend’s car out to the movies and dinner. And while automakers are determining how to enable that customer experience one thing is clear: the driver consumer wants the same, easy to use experience to carry with them from one vehicle to the next, regardless of role or method of use of a vehicle.

What do I mean by this? Digitally connected customers move seamlessly across vehicles with their secured personal identity and profile available for the use and purchase of services. Vehicles maintain the most driver desired customer experience based on real time feedback to engineering designers, significantly reducing warranty claims and updating software during non-use windows. It shouldn’t matter if I’m a passenger in a rideshare or renting a luxury vehicle for the weekend in the big city, my wallet and profile move with me based on personal credentials, personal preferences (pre-sent entertainment, services palate, etc.) and secure on-board data connectivity.

Vehicles are maintained based in similar consistency. Soft service events – uploading software versions or even tuning firmware – occur in off peak times or as needed based on severity. Hard service events occur at low-use hours to reduce labor and operating expense while maximizing availability of vehicles during peak times. Parts are available as needed, at the quickest route to service locations.

Automakers are learning more about the advanced options to support consumer connectivity as drivers, buyers and passengers and the ability that secure data environments supported by SAP HANA can deliver.

This article previously appeared in LinkedIn Pulse and D!gitalist Magazine. Learn more about trends in autonomous and connected vehicles at SAPPHIRENOW in Orlando, Florida (May 15-19) and secure your spot today!

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Filed under automotive, Digital Content Strategy, Mobile Society, Strategy, Technology

Why Apple’s Announcement this week is More than Just About a New Phone

Apple (NASDAQ: $APPL) will make a splash this week with a number of new product and innovation releases.  In fact if you want to track the announcement you can subscribe to a meeting request and a countdown clock on the Apple website.  For those of us scanning the analyst reviews for trends and earnings directions, the event should reveal the largest one-day announcement of new Apple product in the company’s history.  The new phone, a new watch (these days the proper term is “wearable” since a wristwatch is so passe), and a new “phablet” – a large screen phone not quite the same size and use portfolio as the iPad – will all emerge.

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According to Forbes writer Ewan Spence there is a lot of spectacle over this product release:

For fans and followers, journalists and analysts, to pop culture experts, celebrities, and late night chat show hosts, this Tuesday is going to be just like Christmas Day.

For me I am more interested in the location-based service and commercial wallet components that will begin to make their way into the full Apple line of products.  Most users have been accustomed to using apps to provide 2-D and 3-D barcodes to check in to airline flights, buy coffee, or secure reward points in loyalty programs.  This next step is akin to making your phone an actual commercial wallet where the funds are loaded into the wallet via smart chip and app to enable users to make purchases with appropriately enabled point of sale (POS) systems.

I have written about this topic as part of my coverage on #ConvergenceForces last year.  In my opinion, this is the most significant step of a tech vendor to date to really push that vision into a device-ready reality.

Comment or post below your thoughts on the Apple announcement.

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Filed under Cloud Computing, Innovation, Mobile Society, Technology

Why Customer Engagement Matters – Customer Dynamics and Business Judo

My briefing on The Customer Edge with host Butch Stearns and colleague Matt Healey from Technology Business Research provided the post-game interview with SAP Insider CRM 2014 conference.  Some highlights may also be found in my LinkedIn post this week, including some thoughts around generational shifts around social marketing expectations and the business judo that needs to happen to give the power of the brand back to the customer.

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Click on the photo to go to the briefing or select this link

 

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Filed under Big Data, Business Analytics, Change Management and Leadership, Cloud Computing, Digital Content Strategy, Innovation, Marketing and Social Business, Millennial Worker Shift, Mobile Society, Operations, Strategy, Technology

Coffee Break with Game Changers 2014 Predictions Pt 3 – More on Convergence Forces

The popular internet radio talk show program hosted by Bonnie D. Graham returns for its third full season of predictions and trends which will impact business and technology. What will be the disruptive factors in the market in 20-14? I joined Bonnie and the panel during the fourth segment around 56:00 with my take on “convergence forces” to beg the question “can you fish in a tsunami?”

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My opening statement – besides my annual holiday Irish Cream recipe which you can find elsewhere on my blog – is summarized below. You can also find more on this blog and on my SCN page.

One of the big news stories in strategy, innovation and tech circles is the growth and convergence of four key trends from the past two years. These trends – social networking, mobile computing, cloud applications and big data – are not new.  In fact our firm covered these extensively in 2012 and continue to advise clients on how to leverage these trends strategically, both individually and collectively. What is occurring now as we move into 2014 is the cumulative effect of these trends into force directions of their own.  These so-called convergence forces – or what Gartner Group calls nexus of forces (NOF) – have a tendency to amplify and extend innovation in new and more powerful directions, much like strong winds, lunar position, and seismic disturbances can affect the behavior of ocean tides.  To put it another way, you might be able to plan to fish based on high tide but planning to fish during a tsunami is, well, a bit more complicated.

You can plan to fish in a high tide but fishing in a tsunami is a bit more complicated.

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Filed under Big Data, Business Analytics, Change Management and Leadership, Cloud Computing, Cloud Readiness, Digital Content Strategy, Information Technology, Innovation, Marketing and Social Business, Millennial Worker Shift, Mobile Society, Operations, Strategy, Technology

Convergence Forces – The Coming Ethics Debate on Predictive Analytics and Location Based Services

One of the big news stories in strategy, innovation and tech circles is the growth and convergence of four key trends from the past two years. These trends – social networking, mobile computing, cloud applications and big data – are not new.  In fact our firm covered these extensively in 2012 and continue to advise clients on how to leverage these trends strategically, both  individually and collectively. What is occurring now as we move into 2014 is the cumulative effect of these trends into force directions of their own.  These so-called convergence forces – or what Gartner Group calls nexus of forces (NOF) – have a tendency to amplify and extend innovation in new and more powerful directions, much like strong winds, lunar position, and seismic disturbances can affect the behavior of ocean tides.

Photo credit, Cisco Systems.

One of the areas where we are seeing this play out is in the business to consumer pricing strategies of in-store retail.  Location based services – either by way of opt-in applications or mobile browsing cookies – allow known customers to log-in to store applications and view special VIP promotions, to quickly locate where items may be found in the store, and to recommend products which based on sentiment analysis and buying pattern might be of interest to the customer.  Location based predictive analytics can also help retailers determine the best location in a particular store to position items based on customer traffic (using big data to monitor your path via GPS as you actually browse the store or predict where you will go based on history and profile) as well as to dynamically create promotions based on your position and buying status.

Creating special offers and promotions based on an existing relationship is not new in the business to business world.  Suppliers and customers alike receive special treatment and extended services and bundle pricing based on volume of sales, excellent quality, and other relationship management KPIs.  In fact in the world of wealth management and retail banking, customers may find that with particularly large financial institutions the first question they are asked after pleasantries may be “what is your current relationship with us?” While this is hardly endearing to the uninformed, it does grant status to those who may, have for example, several accounts, a loan, a trust and other financial products all aggregated under the same customer portfolio with a particular financial institution.

Where things may run amok in the future is when customers (a) receive deferential pricing based on relationship without permission and (b) when a relationship is implied based on socio-demographic profiling or  when facial recognition technologies are employed.  Let me give two very possible scenarios.  I have an account at a sports and recreation retailer and I walk into the store. As a member I have given them permission to my specific profile information (where I live, what I purchase via history, my demographics) in exchange for an annual dividend at no fee.  The retailer has the ability while I am in-store to make me aware of specific items I might want and key promotions going on at that store on that day.  What the retailer can do is also annotate the base price while I walk through the store.  Meaning that what price I may see before logging in and what price I see after I log-in may be different.  Imagine digital price tags changing and updating dynamically as I walk through the store.  Now in this scenario I am going to assume that the incentive I have to purchase items is a benefit versus a cost so I assume that the store is truly giving me a deal even if they don’t.

Another scenario gets more futuristic but again the convergence forces suggest all plausibility.  I walk into a store that I don’t actively have a relationship with nor have I given permission to share my profile and demographic information.  However due to advances in facial recognition technology (such as what is available in Facebook and other applications commercially), the store can tap into vast image databases and make a best estimate at who I am based on my movements in the store and camera images obtained while I move throughout the store.  This correlation of implied relationship and implied demographics can, under the proper scenario, suggest promotions and product recommendations not aligned to my actual relationship nor my actual demographic and in extreme cases improperly tweak dynamic pricing levels.

While this extreme case is just that, convergence forces already have the attention of retail strategists, ethics experts, media tech publications and even sparked political debate. Earlier this year, U.S. Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY) suggested that analytics companies engaging in such practices without customer knowledge would be “intrusive and unsettling.” prompting the Senator to issue a statement with eight of the key location analytics companies in this space to a new code of conduct which would discourage such practices. Other industry segments have also begun to weigh in on the legitimate and ethical use of predictive analytics including higher education, which can use the technology as a early warning system for right-tracking student performance through degree programs.

Convergence forces in this area have already begun and the debate is reaching the mainstream.  What are your thoughts? And – outside of leaving your phone in the car or forgoing permission to give your profile information to any customer loyalty system or social media site – how do we as consumers protect ourselves from retail profiling when we don’t want it?

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Filed under Big Data, Business Analytics, Cloud Computing, Cloud Readiness, Financial Management, Information Technology, Innovation, Marketing and Social Business, Mobile Society, Operations, Strategy, Technology

Cyborg Cockroach Sparks Ethics Debate

I was interviewed by Emily Underwood for her recent article in Science Magazine on the “Robo Roach” by Backyard Brains, the world’s first commercially available cyborg.  I was able to test drive Robo Roach 12 at the recent TEDxDetroit show.

This concept is based on some of the same neuroscience that is used for treating Parkinson’s patients with the new “pacemaker” stimulation approach.  I have two family friends both in their first three months with a new neural pacemaker and while the effects vary between the two and across all patients who have the procedure, both have experienced a market improvement in their quality of life.

Here is the YouTube video showing how the cyborg is controlled by an iPhone app:

Thanks to Emily for her interest in this technology and the ongoing ethics debate.  What do you think, weird science or freaky cool?

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October 24, 2013 · 7:39 pm

Day 2 #SAPTechEd Live Blog

Here at SAP TechEd I’ll be mixing up a few blog posts with the streams from the day’s events as they occur and as announcements made. Follow me here and on Twitter (@william_newman).

Yesterday’s flurry of announcements around the new and open capabilities started strong in the morning and continued into the evening with a 10-year birthday celebration of the SAP Community Network.  Congratulations to Chip Rodgers and his team for a vibrant knowledge exchange!

A summary of key announcements, with links to be added as and when they become available:

  • Integration of the Hana Enterprise Cloud Platform with Hadoop, SaaS, with scalable sizing with multiple on-ramps for companies of all sizes depending how they would like to amortize their IT assets (or not).
  • SAP Mobile Platform 3.0 releases this week.  Lots of clean up and deeper extensions for mobile processes.  SMP 3.0 is the first release where mobile processes do not need to explicitly connect to back end business suite applications, since they are able to update the table directly.  Don’t have that process in business suite? It’s okay as long as you have good mobile data governance.  (Addresses the classic joke scenario: hey doctor, when my arm heals can I play the violin…. good because I wasn’t able to before … Now SAP customers can build apps to handle processes not found in their Business Suite environment, unencumbered by other enterprise architectural constraints I outlined in one of my earlier articles.) Also better control of renegade or so-called “zombie apps,” forgotten mobile apps from old BYOD and other development efforts still running and still consuming data.
  • Netweaver Gateway’s new release leveraging Open Data (oData) protocols allows for a fresh look at Microsoft integration.  With the new NWG Productivity Accelerator for Microsoft (called Gateway “PAM”) services can be delivered directly to Microsoft applications without the need of a server broker on the Microsoft side.  Lower TCO with higher accessibility to SAP operational data through Microsoft product environments, including a near-term SP1 release to connect Excel.  Plug-in friendly.
  • Cloud convergence became clearer.  Sven Denecken presented an update to the cloud roadmap and it is clear the SuccessFactors underlying architecture which is LOB-driven will be primary with modules reflecting Business Suite applications in ByDesign (ByD) will build on that architecture.  SAP has determined that its cloud EA footprint doesn’t need to be an either/or proposition.  This is good news for current and future SAP customers looking to migrate some business processes or entire operations to the cloud.

More information updated here as and when it becomes available.

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Filed under Big Data, Business Analytics, Cloud Computing, Cloud Readiness, Information Technology, Mobile Society, Operations, Supply Chain Management, Technology